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1801 Fayetteville St. Durham NC 27707
919-530-6100 | Fax: 919-530-7976

    North Carolina Central University
   
 
  Oct 17, 2017
 
 
    
Graduate School Course Catalog 2013-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

The School of Graduate Studies


123 Taylor Education Building
Department Telephone: (919) 530-7396
Fax: (919) 530-7919
www.nccu.edu/graduateprograms (website)

Caesar Jackson, Interim Dean & Director
Graduate Studies & PhD Program
Department Telephone: (919) 530-7396
E-mail: crjackson@nccu.edu

Mission of the School of Graduate Studies

The mission of the School of Graduate Studies at North Carolina Central University is to provide world-class education and to produce leaders that are culturally sensitive and engaged in their respective fields of study. The School of Graduate Studies aims to develop independent study, originality, and competence in research and/or in the application of critical thinking to professional problems and this defines student success for the unit.

Responsibilities of the School of Graduate Studies

Graduate study at North Carolina Central University is designed to provide qualified individuals seeking advanced degrees with a broader, deeper, and more thorough acquaintance with scholarship and research in a chosen field. The School of Graduate Studies is the principal academic unit of North Carolina Central University for graduate and professional education. Through the colleges and schools, the School of Graduate Studies provides administration for the development and creation of new graduate degree programs, admissions to graduate school, and assistantship funding.

The Graduate Dean, Graduate Council, and Graduate Faculty provide the organization by which the Office of the School of Graduate Studies discharges its responsibilities for graduate education at North Carolina Central University.

The duties of the Office of the School of Graduate Studies include the following:

  • Reviews applications for admission to the Graduate School for compliance with academic standards.
  • Upholds academic and admissions standards for graduate programs.
  • Admits all graduate students to graduate programs.
  • Administers all University policies that affect graduate education.
  • Reviews and approves all new graduate programs.
  • Establishes qualifications for and approves membership in the Graduate Faculty.
  • Establishes qualifications necessary for graduate faculty to serve on and to chair thesis and dissertation examining committees.
  • Sets policy that governs the composition of the thesis and dissertation examining committees and the conduct of the examinations.
  • Oversees the process of submitting approved theses and dissertations, preservation of and access to the documents via online digital services such as ProQuest.
  • Provides leadership in the recruitment and retention of graduate students.
  • Provides orientation programs, advising, and other support services that contribute to the successful matriculation, retention, and graduation of graduate students.

Graduate Dean

The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies has the responsibility for implementing the policies and actions of the Graduate Council and the Graduate Faculty and for administering the School of Graduate Studies so that it is effective in implementing and responding to those policies. Additional responsibilities of the Graduate Dean are included in the following:

Allocates annual assistantship funding to the colleges and schools and monitors the application and academic impact of assistantships.
Sets policy for and allocates annual graduate tuition remission awards.
Supports and advises the Graduate Student Association.

Graduate Council

The Graduate Council develops and recommends necessary rules, regulations, policies, and guidelines that govern academic programs leading to advanced degrees. The Graduate Council reviews, evaluates, and provides recommendations to the University on proposals for new graduate programs, and on existing graduate programs; promotes quality in graduate programs; and promotes the general welfare of the graduate students and faculty. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies serves as chairperson of the Graduate Council.

The Graduate Council membership includes the associate dean and graduate faculty representatives from each college or school that sponsors advanced degree programs, plus one representative from the Graduate Student Association. The Graduate Council membership will include the following:

  • College of Arts and Sciences will have its associate dean and two (2) of its graduate faculty members,
  • College of Behavioral and Social Sciences will have its associate dean and two (2) of its graduate faculty members,
  • School of Business will have its associate dean and one (1) of its graduate faculty members,
  • School of Education will have its associate dean and two (2) of its graduate faculty members,
  • School of Library and Information Sciences will have its associate dean and one (1) of its graduate faculty members,
  • School of Law will have its associate dean and one (1) of its Law faculty members,
  • The Ph.D. in Integrated Biosciences (INBS) Program will have the INBS Director as member,
  • One representative of the Graduate Student Association, and
  • Ex-officio member, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Graduate Faculty

The Graduate Faculty are responsible for teaching classes restricted to graduate students, designing the academic content of graduate degree programs, and supervising the writing and defense of graduate student research in the form of projects, theses, and dissertations.

Graduate Faculty can have Full or Adjunct Status. In addition, there also are Special Members to the Graduate Faculty who are scholars with no affiliation with the University.

Graduate Faculty with Full Status

Graduate Faculty with Full Status shall consist of tenured or tenure-track faculty members from academic departments which offer graduate degrees. Graduate Faculty with Full Status qualify based on their academic credentials, scholarly achievements, and abilities in graduate education and research.

Recommendation for appointment as Graduate Faculty with Full Status is initiated by the chairperson of the academic department responsible for the particular graduate program and the dean of the college or school, as appropriate. Recommendations for appointments to the Graduate Faculty with Full Status are approved by the Graduate Council. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies authorizes the Graduate Faculty with Full Status appointment approved by the Graduate Council. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies may execute exceptions to the procedures described and report such to the Graduate Council.

All Graduate Faculty with Full Status may teach any graduate course designated for them by the department in which they serve; supervise and advise graduate students on Theses or Projects; and serve as the chair or a member of graduate students’ Thesis Committees.

All Graduate Faculty with Full Status appointments will be reviewed annually and continuation of this appointment after a period of five years is subject to re-affirmation by the chairperson of the academic department and/or dean of the college or school, as appropriate, to the Graduate Council. The Graduate Faculty with Full Status appointment is terminated upon resignation or retirement.

Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status and Special Members of the Graduate Faculty

Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status may come from the ranks specified in the following categories:

  • Research faculty
  • Clinical faculty
  • Emeritus faculty
  • Visiting faculty
  • Adjunct faculty
  • Part-time faculty
  • Other special categories of qualified faculty such as writers-in-residence or artists-in-residence 
  • Other qualified non-teaching university professional staff members

Recommendation for appointment as Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status is made by the chairperson of the academic department responsible for the particular graduate program and/or the dean of the college or school, as appropriate, based on the nomination from Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the department. Recommendations for appointments to the Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status are approved by the Graduate Council.

 

Special Members of the Graduate Faculty are scholars who may come from the following categories:

  • Tenured and tenure-track faculty members from other universities
  • Qualified professionals external to the university

Nomination for appointment as Special Member to the Graduate Faculty is made by the chairperson of the academic department responsible for the particular graduate program, on the recommendation of the Full Members of the Graduate Faculty in the department. Nominations for appointments as Special Member to the Graduate Faculty are approved by the Graduate Council.

The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies authorizes the Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status and the Special Member to the Graduate Faculty appointments approved by the Graduate Council. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies may execute exceptions to the procedures described and report such to the Graduate Council.

All Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status and Special Members to the Graduate Faculty may teach graduate courses designated for them by the department in which they were recommended and serve as a member of graduate students Thesis Committees. Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status and Special Members to the Graduate Faculty may not serve as the chair of graduate students’ Thesis Committees.

All Graduate Faculty with Adjunct Status and Special Member to the Graduate Faculty appointments will be effective for periods of up to five years and may be re-approved for periods of up to five years based on appropriate review and on recommendation of the chairperson of the academic department to the Graduate Council. Both of these types of appointment are terminated upon resignation or retirement.

Graduate Student Association

The North Carolina Central University Graduate Student Association (GSA) is an advocacy organization composed of graduate and professional students at North Carolina Central University. GSA representatives exist to provide a voice for North Carolina Central University’s entire graduate and professional student body. The organization represents graduate students at formal University sponsored meetings and provides a forum for dialogue between graduate students and other campus units, including University faculty and administrators. NCCU GSA organizes academic, professional, and social events designed to foster intellectual growth and interchange within the graduate community.

Graduate Degrees Offered at NCCU

The Graduate School at North Carolina Central University confers graduate and professional degrees through the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Schools of Business, Education, Law, and Library and Information Sciences. The graduate and professional degrees awarded by North Carolina Central University are the following:

MASTER OF ARTS (MA)
MASTER OF SCIENCE (MS)
MASTER OF MUSIC (MM)
MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (MPA)
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (MSW)
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION (MBA)
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (M.A.T.)
MASTER OF LIBRARY SCIENCE (MLS)
MASTER OF INFORMATION SCIENCE (MIS)
MASTER OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION (MSA)

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.)

JURIS DOCTOR (J.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Integrated Biosciences is offered through the School of Graduate Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences. The Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree is offered through the School of Law.

Joint Degrees

North Carolina Central University offers two four-year programs that lead to the award of joint degrees: J.D./M.B.A.(Master of Business Administration) and J.D. /MLS (Master in Library Science).  To participate in the joint degree programs, an applicant must apply and be accepted to both the School of Law and the Master of Business Administration or the Master of Library and Information Science program.  Prospective joint-degree students should investigate these options prior to or at the end of their first year of Law School. Students in a joint degree program must successfully complete all their required first year courses of study in the School of Law.

NCCU also offers a joint degree between the School of Business and the School of Library and Information Sciences: M.B.A/M.I.S (Master of Business Administration/Master of Information Science).

Graduate Programs Offered at NCCU

Graduate School at North Carolina Central University is organized by subject matter departments which offer graduate education and training leading to advanced degrees. Graduate degree programs at NCCU offered through each College/School are listed in the following:

College of Arts and Sciences

Arts and Humanities

English (MA)
English Secondary Education (MEd)
History (MA)
Jazz Studies (MM)

Sciences

Biology (MS)
Chemistry (MS)
Earth Sciences (MS)
Mathematics (MS)
Pharmaceutical Sciences (MS)
Physics (MS)

School of Graduate Studies/ College of Arts and Sciences

Integrated Biosciences (Ph.D.)

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Adapted Physical Education (MS)
Executive Master of Public Admin (EMPA)
Family and Consumer Sciences (MS)
Law Enforcement and Corrections (MS)
Physical Education (MS)
Psychology (MA)
Public Administration (MPA)
Recreation Administration (MS)
Social Work (MSW)

School of Business

Business Administration (MBA)
Joint MBA / Master of Information Science (MBA/MIS)

School of Education

Career Counseling (MA)
Communications Disorders (MEd)
Educational Technology (MA)
Master of Arts in Teaching in Special Education (MAT)
Mental Health Counseling (MA)
School Administration (MSA)
School Counseling (MA)
Special Education - Blind and Visually Impaired (MEd)

School of Library & Information Sciences

Information Sciences (MIS)
Library Science (MLS)

School of Law

Law (J.D.)

 

Online Graduate Degree Programs

Currently there are three graduate programs offered online through distance education:

  • Master of Information Science
  • Master of Library Science
  • Master of Arts in Educational Technology

Graduate Program Accreditations

North Carolina Central University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award bachelor’s and master’s degrees, the Ph.D. degree, and the first professional degree of Law. NCCU graduate programs also have specialized accreditations which include the following:

Business: Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBS); Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)

Chemistry: American Chemical Society (ACS)

Child Development (Family & Consumer Sciences): National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

Communication Disorders: Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

Counseling: Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

Criminal Justice: North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission (NC CJETSC)

Dietetics (Family & Consumer Sciences): Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE)

Education: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE); North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI)

Law: American Bar Association (ABA); North Carolina State Bar Council (NCBC)

Library & Information Sciences: American Library Association (ALA)

Physical Education & Recreation: National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA)/ American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (AAPAR)

Social Work: Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)

Graduate Admissions

Admissions Overview

All graduate admission requirements and procedures within and for the School of Graduate Studies at North Carolina Central University were developed to maintain the integrity of NCCU and the University of North Carolina System. These requirements and procedures also were established to meet standards as dictated by the University administration and criteria from accreditation agencies. The School of Graduate Studies manages graduate admission for all graduate and professional programs except Law. Applicants for the Law School apply online through the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC). The School of Graduate Studies accepts applications to Graduate School through the ApplyYourself® online application process management system by Hobsons.

Graduate and Professional Admissions Requirements

  • Applicants for Graduate and Professional Study must have earned a baccalaureate (bachelor’s) degree from an accredited institution, having earned a minimum grade point average of 2.75 or a 3.0 average for the last four semesters of study for the bachelor’s degree.
  • Applicants for PhD Study must have earned a bachelor’s or a master’s degree from an accredited institution in a discipline related to the program with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall.

Applying to Graduate School

Applications for admission to Graduate School at NCCU are submitted online using the ApplyYourself online application system. Applicants should consult the specific graduate program of interest in the individual colleges or schools for more information about their admission requirements. Applications for admission to Graduate School should generally include the following:

  • One (1) official transcript from each higher educational institution attended must be submitted. Sealed transcripts should be mailed directly to applicant, and the original sealed transcript should be included as part of the graduate school application package.
  • For Graduate and Professional Admission-At least two Application Evaluation and Recommendation Forms completed by persons familiar with applicant’s academic work should be included in the graduate school packet. (In the event applicant has been out of school for a number of years, two work references are appropriate.)
  • For PhD Program Admission-Three current letters of recommendation from persons qualified to evaluate your academic and professional qualifications are required.
  • International applicants who are graduates of institutions of higher education located outside the U.S.A. in non-English speaking countries are required to demonstrate proficiency in the English language, generally by having official scores from the Test of English as a foreign language (TOEFL) submitted as part of the admission packet. International students must also have a Visa clearance form completed by the International Student Advisor at the school currently attending or recently attended and a photocopy of 1-20, I-94 and Visa page of current passport.
  • Applicants for Graduate and Professional Study in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Behavioral and Social Sciences, School of Library and Information Sciences and the School of Education typically require GRE scores (individual graduate programs should be consulted for any exceptions). The MBA applicants must include a recent score from the GMAT, and a resume. Applicants may contact the particular college/school or program regarding minimum score requirements on these standardized tests.
  • School of Education applicants should include a copy of current teaching license if currently certified.
  • Applicants for PhD Study must include GRE scores (no more than 5 years old), a Resume, and a Statement of Purpose.
  • Applications for the PhD Program and the Graduate and Professional Programs should be received in the School of Graduate Studies in each college and school by the final deadline for each semester. It should be noted that deadlines are earlier for International applicants. Applications received after the appropriate date will be considered for the next entrance.
  • Prospective student’s application packet and a forty dollar ($40.00) non-refundable application fee should be mailed to the School of Graduate Studies or the appropriate admitting office. If credit is not used, the fee must be in the form of a cashier’s check, certified check or money order payable to North Carolina Central University.

Admissions for International Applicants

For admission purposes, all applicants who are both non-citizens of the United States and are graduates of institutions of higher learning located outside the United States are defined as international applicants. In addition to providing academic credentials and letters (or forms) of recommendation, international applicants must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the English language by taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). An interview may be required. The TOEFL score (minimum of 79 on internet-based test or 550 on paper-based test required for admission) must be submitted directly from ETS-TOEFL iBT, P.O. Box 6153, Princeton, NJ 08541-6153 USA, U.S.A. to the Office of the School of Graduate Studies, North Carolina Central University. Proficiency may also be demonstrated by passing a full academic year of college level freshman English (i.e., The equivalent of ENG 1110, ENG 1210) with a grade of “C” or better at an accredited institution of higher education in the United States, or by successfully completing the English Language Program at one of the many English as Second Language (ESL) Centers in the U.S. Exceptions will be made for those whose native language is English or whose medium of instruction has been English.
  • Generally, international applicants with academic credits from institutions outside the United States should have academic documents submitted directly by the institution to the Office of the School of Graduate Studies, North Carolina Central University. Where original documents are impossible to obtain, properly notarized documents will be considered. The notarization should be done by a proper government official or proper representative of the American Embassy in the country. In addition, students who have attended a college or university outside the United States must submit to the NCCU School of Graduate Studies an official course-by-course evaluation of all courses via one of the following services accredited by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services:

AACRAO International Education Services, 202-293-9161, ext. 6600

Education Evaluators International, 401-521-5340

Educational Credential Evaluations, 414-289-3400

International Education Research Foundation, 310-258-9451

Josef Silny Inc., 305-273-1616

World Education Services,              800-937-3895

  • International applicants are required to submit documentation certifying their capacity to meet the financial requirements necessary to complete the master’s or Ph.D. degree program.

Types of Graduate Admissions

Unconditional Admissions

A student holding the bachelor’s degree from North Carolina Central University or any other accredited institution is eligible for unconditional admission to the Graduate Division under the following provisions:

  1. The overall undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of the applicant must be at least 2.7 with degree completion. Also there must be an average of 3.0 GPA (“B”) or better reflected in 30 semester hours or more of the undergraduate record of the applicant in a major that is in the same or a related area of the proposed graduate program.
  2. Applicants must meet any additional minimal requirements for the department offering the proposed graduate program. Additional minimal requirements, if there are any, will be indicated in this catalog under the sections for individual academic departments and programs.
  3. Applicants who intend to qualify for graduate secondary school teaching licensure must hold the initial high school licensure or its equivalent.

Conditional Admission

Conditional admission may be granted to the applicant if:

  • The previous academic record does not satisfy levels for unconditional status; or
  • The prerequisite course work in the chosen discipline is insufficient; or
  • The applicant has not provided some official information required by the graduate program or the School of Graduate Studies.

Such applicants may be admitted for a trial period as an opportunity to exhibit academic performance equal to or greater than minimum level, to successfully complete prescribed prerequisites; and/or to submit official information missing in the graduate application.

Deferred Admission

Applicants who have been admitted to a graduate program at NCCU may defer their admission up to one year with the approval of the academic department.  If the applicant wishes to defer admission he/she must notify the department in writing with this request. If the department approves the request to defer, then the department must contact the School of Graduate Studies to initiate notification of the student and modification of the student’s admission status.

Special Graduate Students

The School of Graduate Studies recognizes the admission classification of special graduate students. This designation is a temporary classification for persons who wish to take courses for licensure renewal, for transfer to another institution, or for personal satisfaction. Students admitted as special graduate students are not candidates for a graduate degree. Special graduate students may take courses for graduate credit. Should the student later complete a graduate application and successfully get admitted to a graduate program, the special graduate student classification terminates. A maximum of nine (9) semester hours of credits earned during special graduate student status may be applied toward the fulfillment of the requirements of the Master’s degree provided:

  1. The action is recommended by the chairperson of the academic department and approved by the dean;
  2. The academic work is not more than two years old;
  3. The academic work is “B” level or better, and
  4. The academic work has not been taken to remove admission deficiencies.

Registration

Students use the NCCU Eagles Online (EOL) website to access Self Service Banner (SSB) for web registration.   SSB is for registration and is available during the period of time regulated by the Academic Calendar for each semester.  Additionally, not only does SSB afford students the opportunity to register, but students can also view their class schedules, institutional (NCCU) transcripts, student account information, financial aid information, and grades as well as track their academic progress.

The Alternate PIN (personal identification number) is used during the registration process.  Students must get an Alternate PIN to register for classes. The Alternate PIN is changed each semester to insure security and to encourage students and advisors to meet at least twice each academic year to review the students’ progress. Students are required to meet with their advisors prior to registration to discuss curricula plans and course schedules and to receive their Alternate PIN.

As designated by the Academic Calendar of the University, the registration period officially ends on the day designated as the last day of late registration and schedule adjustments.  At this time course schedules will be canceled for students who have not made satisfactory payment arrangements.

Late fees for registration are imposed on the date indicated on the Academic Calendar.  Classes may not be added or dropped after the last day for schedule adjustments as indicated in the Academic Calendar.

Full Time Graduate Enrollment

Full-time enrollment in Graduate School at NCCU is satisfied at nine (9) semester hours each regular academic semester.

Half Time Graduate Enrollment

Half-time enrollment in Graduate School at NCCU is satisfied at four (4) semester hours each regular academic semester.

Changes in Registration

During the late registration period student may drop and/or add courses with the approval of the faculty advisor and the dean of their college or school.  Student may drop classes using the online Self Service Banner system during the first week of the drop/add period and may add any class that is open.  After the fifth class day, student may add classes with a drop/add card signed by the advisor and instructor and presented to the Registrar’s Office before the end of the last day of the drop/add period.  Student may still drop classes using the online Self Service Banner system until 5 p.m. of the last day of the drop/add period. After the end of the drop/add period, student may not add a class.  Also, they will not receive a refund or adjustment in the amount owed for classes dropped.

Withdrawing from Courses

Student may withdraw from individual courses without penalty with the permissions of the academic advisor and the dean by presenting a signed withdrawal form to the Registrar’s office by the last day for students to withdraw from courses; however, there will be no adjustment in tuition bills if courses are withdrawn during this period. The grade received for these courses will be “WC.” Graduate students may not withdraw from courses after the last withdrawal day designated in the Academic Calendar.  (This date is the same for undergraduate and graduate students.)  Students who “unofficially withdraw” from courses by not attending classes will receive the grade of “NF,” which computes the same as an “F.”

CAUTION:  Withdrawing from courses may adversely affect financial aid eligibility.  Before withdrawing from a course, students should consult with the NCCU Office of Scholarships and Student Aid or with the entity providing their financial aid.

Continuous Registration

Graduate education at NCCU requires continuous enrollment based on a regular academic year, exclusive of the summer sessions. The regular academic year at NCCU begins in August for the fall semester and ends in May for the spring semester. Following admission as a degree-seeking student in a graduate program at NCCU, students are generally required to register each semester until the degree is earned.  This continuous enrollment requirement in most graduate programs is exclusive of the summer sessions; however students should check program specific requirements. For instance, the Communications Disorders program requires students to enroll for summer sessions. Students not maintaining continuous enrollment in graduate courses will be required to seek readmission and adhere to prevailing program requirements if readmission is granted.

If a graduate student expects to interrupt his/her continuous enrollment, then he/she should request a leave of absence from the Graduate School before registration ends for the academic term in which the leave is to begin. If the graduate student does not secure a leave of absence and his/her continuous enrollment is interrupted, then the student must apply for readmission should he/she seek to return to Graduate School.

Leave of Absence

Graduate students may request a leave of absence from graduate study by completing the Request for Leave of Absence form which is provided by the School of Graduate Studies. Signature approval for a request for leave of absence is given by the chair/academic dean of the graduate program and the dean of the Graduate School. Students on an approved leave of absence will automatically be readmitted effective the semester of return indicated on the Request for Leave of Absence. Time limits for graduate degree programs in the case of approved leaves of absences are paused when the leave begins and restarted when the leave ends.

Graduate Readmission

Any new graduate student who does not enroll in courses during the academic term to which he/she was initially admitted must apply for readmission in the next consecutive semester with an updated application.

Any graduate student who skips enrolling in courses for a semester in a regular academic year must apply for readmission in the immediate next regular academic semester before being permitted to resume graduate study. The readmission application should be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies at least two weeks prior to the opening of registration for the academic term in which the student wishes to resume graduate study.

Any graduate student who has not been enrolled in his/her program of study for two or more consecutive regular academic semesters or longer than a regular academic year must apply for readmission and must meet the current admission requirements of the graduate program at the time of the request for readmission.

Time limits for graduate degree programs are still in effect with readmission. Time limits begin on the date of the student’s registration in his or her first course for Master’s degree or PhD degree credit at North Carolina Central University. Therefore, if a student has not been enrolled in Graduate School for two or more consecutive regular academic semesters or longer than a regular academic year the student must consult with his/her academic and/or research advisor before making a formal request for readmission.

If the time limit for the graduate program has not expired for the student seeking readmission, then the request for readmission must include an academic record review and a plan of completion within graduate program time limit.

If the time limit for the graduate program has expired for the student seeking readmission, then the request for readmission must include an academic record review, a plan of completion with a time limit of two years. If readmission to Graduate School is granted for students with expired time limits, then the graduate student must submit a request for extension of time to complete the graduate program to the Graduate School during the first semester he/she is readmitted.

The request for readmission to a graduate program must include

  1. An application for readmission
  2. An academic record review with chronology of the student’s previous work and academic progress in the respective Program;
  3. An itemized statement of the work which remains to be done for completion of the Program and a specific timeline for completion of that work.  This includes an itemized plan of action or steps (an academic success plan) that ensures a reasonable probability of success in completing the Program within the set time limit.
  4. If the student does not currently have at least a 3.0 GPA, then the student’s academic plan must outline how the student will have acquired a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 within one academic year of readmission.
  5. If a student has been away from the University for one or more years, then the student’s readmission is contingent on an academic success plan including a residency requirement of at least 12 credit hours in one academic year; and a thesis, or project if required by the Department.
  6. The student’s academic success plan must also include any other courses required or specified by the Department.

Tuition and Fees

Graduate, PhD, or law students who carry nine or more hours must pay full tuition and fees. Tuition rates and fees are posted on the University’s web site at: http://www.nccu.edu/admissionsandaid/tuitionandfees/

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests on whether a student is a North Carolina resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes.  Each student must make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in the state, and the university will use that to determine whether the student qualifies for the in-state rate.  The general rule is that to qualify as a resident of North Carolina for tuition purposes, a person must become a legal resident and remain one for at least 12 months.

Graduate students must have health insurance, and must either provide evidence of credible coverage of their own or enroll in the statewide plan offered by all UNC System campuses. The three criteria that invoke the requirement for the student insurance plan are: enrollment in a degree-seeking program, enrollment in six or more credit hours of on-campus classes, and eligibility to pay the campus student medical fee.  Students who do not meet the criteria are eligible to enroll in a voluntary plan.

Financial Assistance for Graduate Students

Completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the first step toward getting federal aid for graduate school. FAFSA data is used to determine student’s eligibility for state and school aid, and some private financial aid providers may use FAFSA information to determine whether the student qualifies for their aid. Therefore, the FAFSA should be completed whether the financial aid being sought is scholarships, fellowships, or loans.

Federal Financial Aid

Graduate and professional students who apply, are awarded, and accept a loan from William D. Ford Direct Loan Program will be awarded an Unsubsidized Loan for the maximum amount of $20,500 for the academic year in addition to Graduate Plus Loan up to the cost of attendance.

WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT - UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOANS

  • NCCU does not certify private/alternative loans
  • Direct Loan funds are from federal government
  • FAFSA is required annually; Master Promissory Note (MPN) must be completed online at www.studentloans.gov
  • Loan Limits (Aggregate)-Graduate & Professional: $138,500 including undergraduate borrowing
  • Graduate/Professional students must be enrolled in at least half-time (4.5 hours)

Repayment begins 6 months after cessation of at least half-time enrollment; deferment possible; no interest subsidy on unsubsidized loan.

WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT - GRADUATE PLUS LOAN

  • NCCU does not certify private/alternative loans
  • Direct Loan funds are from federal government
  • FAFSA is required annually; PLUS Master Promissory Note (MPN) must be completed online at www.studentloans.gov
  • No annual or aggregate amounts.
  • Graduate/professional student may not borrow more than difference between cost of attendance and other financial assistance student expects to received
  • No adverse credit history approved and must not be in default on a Federal Loan
  • Graduate/Professional students must be enrolled at least half-time (4.5 hours)
  • Must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen and borrower is responsible for all the interest
  • Repayment begins 60 days after loan is fully disbursed
  • Loan is deferrable while enrolled

Special Students Restriction

Students with admittance status of Special Student are not eligible for financial aid which includes all Federal Loans. Students must be admitted to a degree seeking program in order to receive financial aid.

Graduate Licensure Status

A student is admitted into a graduate licensure program, will be awarded as Undergraduate student and will not be eligible for grants. The maximum award will be $12,500. Graduate students in the licensure program must be enrolled in at least half-time (6 hours).

Non-Federal Financial Aid

NCCU offers financial assistance in the form of Graduate Assistantships, Graduate Tuition Awards, Graduate Tuition Remissions, and PhD Fellowships. These are very limited funds at the University. These graduate financial assistance resources at NCCU are administered through the School of Graduate Studies. The School of Graduate Studies makes allocations of these funds to the graduate programs by way of the college and school deans to the graduate program department chairpersons. Assistantships for graduate students may also be supported through faculty research grants as Research Assistantships and through departmental teaching funds as Graduate Teaching Assistantships. Program departments may also have other sources of graduate student aid such as endowed funds from donors, foundations, or corporations. Therefore students should contact their graduate program departments for information on available financial support.

Graduate Assistantships

Eligibility for graduate assistantships administered by the School of Graduate Studies includes the following:

  • Unconditional admission to a graduate degree program
  • Full-time graduate enrollment (typically a minimum of 6 or 9 credit hours per term)
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 , and
  • Good academic standing and a record of clear progress toward completing the degree program.

Graduate assistantships involve providing instructional support, administrative support or supervised teaching or research to the University. A graduate student who receives a graduate assistantship is employed by the university. Graduate students may not work more than 20 hours per week. For continued assistantship support, the graduate student must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0.

Graduate Tuition Awards

Graduate Tuition Awards are for residents of North Carolina and pays for the cost of in-state graduate tuition. Non-residents may also receive a Graduate Tuition Award to pay the in-state component of tuition. Fees are not covered by these funds. Students must provide some form of service (Federal Work-Study, University Work-Aid or a Graduate Assistantship) of value at least $1,000.00 per semester to qualify for a Graduate Tuition Award. For continued tuition award support, the graduate student must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0.

Graduate Tuition Remission

Graduate Tuition Remission is for students classified as non-residents and reduces the cost of out-of-state tuition to that of the in-state rate. Fees are not covered by these funds. Students must provide some form of service (Federal Work-Study, University Work-Aid or a Graduate Assistantship) of value at least $1,000.00 per semester to qualify for a Graduate Tuition Remission. For continued tuition remission support, the graduate student must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0.

Graduate and Professional Education at NCCU

Graduate programs at NCCU at the Master’s degree level may be research-based, project-based, or practicum-based. The Master’s degree programs at NCCU have Thesis or Non-thesis options and generally require from 30 to 36 credits hours to complete.  Some professional programs such as Public Administration and in the School of Business and School of Education have higher credit hour requirements ranging from 45 to 62.  Graduate students take 5000-level courses in their Master’s degree program. Thesis options require a substantial research component, and Non-thesis options require project, practicum, or coursework. The Master of Music degree has the Performance option and the Composition/Arrangement option. In addition, requirements to complete the Master’s degree program usually include satisfying a foreign language requirement, passing a comprehensive examination, and passing an oral examination. The oral examination is typically the student’s defense of the written thesis, project paper, or practicum portfolio.

The Ph.D. Degree in Integrated Biosciences at NCCU is a research degree. Coursework is at the 8000-level for PhD students. The Ph.D. degree is awarded on the basis of achievement in a wide range of course work; a qualifying examination (written and/or oral) evaluating the breadth and depth of background knowledge; intensive research experience during which the candidate demonstrates ability to initiate, perform, and analyze original academic research; a written dissertation; and defense of the dissertation through a final oral examination.

The Juris Doctor degree is offered through the School of Law at NCCU. The School of Law handles all admissions and academics for Law: http://law.nccu.edu/

Research at NCCU

Library Facilities

Library resources at North Carolina Central University are located in the James E. Shepard Memorial Library, the Music Library, the School of Library and Information Sciences Library, the School of Law Library, and the Curriculum Materials Center located in the School of Education.  These libraries contain a total of over 850,000 volumes.  They subscribe to a total of 6,165 periodicals.

NCCU is a member of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN).  TRLN is a cooperative comprised of libraries at Duke University, NCCU, UNC at Chapel Hill, and NC State University, with combined collections of over 10 million volumes.  NCCU students can borrow directly from any of the TRLN institutions by presenting a valid NCCU student ID card.  Borrowing privileges at TRLN libraries are extended to faculty, staff, and administrators who present a current University ID card.  Additional library resources are available at the remaining thirteen institutions in the UNC System, where graduate students and faculty have direct borrowing privileges.  Electronic access to these collections is provided via Search TRLN and UNC Express, which are integrated online catalogs.

Human Subjects

Research involving human subjects is required by federal regulation [45 CFR 46.102] to be reviewed and approved or declared exempt by an Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Research Subjects. The NCCU Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research reviews and approves all requests to use humans as subjects in research.  This includes educational tests, survey procedures, interview procedures or observations of public behavior, as defined by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) regulations. The NCCU Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research has the authority to review, approve, or disapprove all research endeavors initiated, promoted, and supported by the university. All proposed research involving human subjects conducted under the auspices of a department, school, or research unit within the university requires completion of the Request for Review of Research Involving Human Subjects and the Research Protocol forms and submission to the Office of Sponsored Research and Programs (OSRP) prior to submitting a proposal for extramural funding to support such research.

Animal Subjects

NCCU endorses the Principles for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health; has implemented the recommendations of The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (1996); and is complying, and will continue to comply, with the Animal Welfare Act and other applicable statues and regulations concerning the care and use of laboratory animals. NCCU recognizes that laboratory animals are sentient creatures. Their use is a privilege accompanied by an ethical and legal obligation for their humane care and handling. Individuals whose work requires them to use animals in research or instruction must understand and be committed to fulfilling the legal and moral responsibilities of such use. The NCCU Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) reviews and approves all requests to utilize vertebrate animals in research or education, evaluates research protocols and inspects animal laboratory housing facilities.

NCCU Research Institutes

NCCU’s Julius L. Chambers Biomedical Biotechnology Research Institute (JLC-BBRI) is an innovative research and training Institute dedicated to the advancement of fundamental knowledge of human diseases, particularly those that disproportionately affect under-represented minority groups. The JLC-BBRI facility provides 40,000 sq. ft. of basic research space, which includes eleven modern research laboratories. Additional research support facilities include warm and cold rooms, cell culture laboratories, an animal facility, and computing and visualization laboratories. The JLC-BBRI is supported by NCCU and through a variety of other public and private sources. Investigator-initiated RO1 grants, cooperative agreements, and training grants with various federal agencies constitute the major sources of research and training funds for the JLC-BBRI.

The University’s Biomanufacturing Research Institute and Technology Enterprise (BRITE) leads our research and training in biotechnology and biomanufacturing. BRITE has a strong research focus, particularly in the areas of drug discovery and manufacturing technology. BRITE facility features 21,000 square feet of classroom and office space, as well as 31,000 square feet of laboratory space. In addition there are common equipment rooms and industry-inspired core laboratories including the following: Drug Discovery Core Facility; Protein Expression, Purification and Formulation Core Facility; Imaging Core Facility; Monoclonal Antibody Production Core Facility; and Technology Core Facility.

Academic Policies

Transfer of Graduate Credit

A maximum of six semester hours of course work may be transferred from another institution for most graduate programs.  Professional programs with the higher credit hour requirements may accept up to twelve semester hours of transfer credit.  Transfer of graduate credit from another institution may be considered if

  1. The course is graduate level at an accredited university;
  2. The student earned at least a grade of “B” or equivalent in each course for which credit is to be transferred;
  3. The advisor, department chairperson, and dean of the college approve the course as part of the student’s graduate program; and
  4. The courses do not exceed the time limit for completing the Master’s or Ph.D. degree program.

Grading System

The University recognizes the grades that follow in the evaluation of the performance of graduate students.

A Work of superior quality
B Satisfactory passing work
C Low passing work
F Failure
P Pass
I Incomplete; Work that has not been fully completed.  Must be completed within one year or the grade will be replaced with “F” and the course will have to be repeated for credit.
NF Represents a course in which the student stopped attending classes without officially dropping the class; counts as a failing grade
W Indicates that the student withdrew from the University for the term
WC Indicates that the student officially withdrew from the class
NP Denotes that a student registered in a thesis conference, project, research, or internship course has not made satisfactory progress during the semester
NW Represents a course in which the student stopped attending without officially withdrawing from the class
PR Denotes that a student registered in a thesis, project, research, or internship course has made satisfactory progress but has not successfully completed the required work, and
AU Represents an audited class; must be declared as an audit before the end of the official drop/add period

Quality Points

Quality points are assigned for the purpose of determining the cumulative grade point average as follows:

A = 4
B = 3
C = 2
F = 0
NF = 0

Grades of P, I, W, WC, NP, NW, PR, and AU do not compute into the grade point average.

Grade Point Average (GPA) Calculation

The cumulative grade point average is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of hours attempted. Graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 to continue in the Graduate School and for graduation requirements.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Class Attendance

Graduate students are expected to meet full class attendance. Conditions on and penalties for class absences will be described in individual graduate course syllabi.

Withdrawal from a Course

All changes in course schedules after the close of registration require the signature of the instructors involved, the student’s advisor, and the Dean of the College. The form for this purpose may be obtained from the major department and it must be delivered to the Office of the University Registrar. Graduate students may withdraw from a course at any time up to the official last day to withdraw from a course for the semester as established by the University Calendar. A graduate student who stops attending a course without notifying the instructor, the dean, and the registrar may receive a grade of “NF” in that course. If a graduate student withdraws from a course or courses before the official last day to withdraw, but remains registered in other courses, the withdrawn course or courses will be assigned a grade of “WC.” The “NF” grade is computed in the GPA the same as an “F” grade. The “WC” grade does not compute in the GPA.

Minimum Grade Point Average (GPA)

Graduate students are required to maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 (“B”) and are expected to complete their degree program requirements within the time limit or the respective Master’s of Ph.D. degree program. The evaluation period for GPA monitoring is each academic term, i.e., fall and spring semesters and summer sessions.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

When the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, the graduate student is placed on academic probation and has one calendar year to raise the GPA to at least 3.0. Failure to accomplish this is cause for dismissal from Graduate School.

Students who are placed on probation become ineligible for graduate assistantships and may also lose their financial aid eligibility.  After graduate assistantship and financial aid have been withdrawn, students may re-establish satisfactory academic progress by attending subsequent semesters at their own expense and improving their hours and/or GPA to meet the required standards.

Three Grades of “C”: A graduate student who receives three grades of “C” will be placed on academic probation even if his/her GPA is 3.0 or better. Failure to improve the grade in one of the courses and maintain at least a 3.0 GPA within one calendar year maybe cause for dismissal from the graduate program.

Repeating Courses

At the discretion of the academic department, a graduate student may repeat no more than two courses in which grades of “C” were earned for the purpose of improving his/her grade point average. The courses may be repeated once, and only once, for a higher grade. Although all grades initially earned or repeated will remain a part of the permanent record, only the highest earned grade will be used in computing the grade point average. The repeating of courses may result in an improved grade point average but credits for only one of the same course can count toward the graduate program degree requirements. Students who repeat courses are still bound to the time limits of the graduate degree program.

Grade of “F”: A graduate student who receives a grade of “F” may not continue in Graduate School and is dismissed from the program.

Request for Reinstatement After Dismissal for Receiving a Grade of “F”

Before making a formal request for reinstatement following dismissal for receiving grade of “F”, the student must consult with his/her academic and/or research advisor. The student must make his/her request for reinstatement following dismissal for receiving grade of “F” through a prepared request packet to include a cover letter addressed to the Chair of the Department or Director of a Program and a copy of the student’s academic record. The cover letter must include the following information:

  • A statement of the request for reinstatement following dismissal for receiving grade of “F”;
  • The reasons for failing the course;
  • Why the student feels he/she should be permitted to continue in the program; and
  • Description of a plan that will ensure success in retaking the course and in re-establishing satisfactory academic progress.

The procedure to request reinstatement following dismissal for receiving grade of “F” is as follows:

  1. The student should submit request for reinstatement to the department chairperson.
  2. The chairperson will review the request, the student’s record, and consult with the graduate program faculty.
  3. The chair will provide a written recommendation to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.
  4. The Graduate Dean will convey to the student in writing the administrative decision regarding the request for reinstatement.

Time Limitations

The time limit for the completion of graduate degree program requirements in all masters-level graduate degree programs is six years. The time limit for completion of Ph.D. program requirements is eight years. The time limit begins on the date of the student’s registration in his or her first course for graduate degree or PhD degree credit at North Carolina Central University.

Extension of Time

A student whose Master’s or PhD time limit has expired is regarded by the Graduate School is automatically terminated from the program. An extension of the time for completion of the Master’s or Ph.D. degree beyond the respective time limit may be requested in exceptional circumstances and granted with certain conditions.  Typically, the time extension should not exceed one calendar year.

Before making a formal request for an extension of time, the student must consult with his/her academic and/or research advisor to agree with the request and to assist in preparing an extension of time request packet. The student must make his/her request for extension of time through a prepared request packet and a cover letter addressed to the Chair of the Department or Director of a Program. The cover letter must include the following information:

  • A statement of the request being made;
  • The reasons for not completing the degree program requirements within the time limits;
  • The proposed length and ending date of the extension requested; and
  • A statement about the plan developed by the student and advisor that will ensure success in completing the Program.

The extension of time request packet must include:

  1. An academic review report on the student that gives the current status in the Program and the chronology of the progress made to date.
  2. A revalidation of courses that are more than five years old at the time of the request or include in the work plan new coursework that provides up-to-date disciplinary content knowledge.
  3. A description of what the student has to do to finish the Program, such as complete specific courses, pass the Comprehensive or Qualifying Examination, defend the thesis or dissertation.
  4. A work plan that itemizes remaining work to be done and a specific timeline for completion of the itemized work. This work plan should include a detailed plan of action or steps (an academic success plan) that ensures a reasonable probability of success in completing the Program.  If the student does not currently have at least a 3.0 GPA, then the student’s academic plan must outline how the student will have acquired a cumulative GPA of 3.0 within 12 months from the date that the extension begins.
  5. A letter of support and commitment from the academic and/or research advisor.
  6. The following statements endorsed by the student:
  •  I understand that not following the plan in the request for time extension may result in the Department rescinding any recommendation it has made in support of my request for extension of time.
  • I understand that during the approved extension of time, I must be continuously enrolled either in Thesis/Dissertation or in courses required by the program or the terms of the extension. Failure to do so will void the extension.

If the request for extension of time is supported, the Department or Program must submit its recommendation for a time extension to the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School, in consultation with the Graduate Council, will review the unit’s recommendation. He/she will inform the student in writing of the decision regarding the request for extension of time. Any conditions of a granted extension of time will be cited in the Graduate Dean’s letter to the student.

Should there be a second request for extension of time, it must be made prior to the expiration of the first extension and following the same procedure. Consideration of a second request will be subject to a satisfactory progress report submitted by the student’s advisor to the Graduate Committee of the Department. No consideration will be given to a third request for extension of time.

Academic Integrity Policy

As a center of learning, teaching, and research, North Carolina Central University charges its members to maintain patterns of academic behavior which enable these essential functions.

Academic Dishonesty Defined

Academic dishonesty is defined as any conduct which is intended by the student to obtain for him/her or for others an unfair or false evaluation in connection with any examination or other work for academic credit. Cheating, fabrication, plagiarism and complicity are examples of conduct which is academically dishonest.

Cheating is the unauthorized use of materials in connection with an examination or other work for academic credit, including, but not limited to:

  1. The use of books, notes, outlines, etc. during an examination where the instructor has not authorized use of such materials or information;
  2. Seeking unauthorized materials or information from others in connection with an examination;
  3. Giving or attempting to give unauthorized assistance to another person in connection with an examination;
  4. Obtaining or attempting to obtain unauthorized copies of examinations;
  5. Bringing to an examination, or attempting to use during an examination, unauthorized answers which have been prepared before the examination period;
  6. Copying or attempting to copy from the work of another student during an examination; and,
  7. Submitting for evaluation in a course, part or the whole of a work for which credit has been given previously.

Fabrication is the invention, counterfeiting and/or alteration of quoted passages, data, procedures, experiments, sources or other information in connection with any academic exercise.

Plagiarism is the use of the ideas, words, or works of another without attribution when the information provided is not common knowledge either in content or form and includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Quoting from the published or unpublished work of another without appropriate attribution;
  2. Paraphrasing or summarizing in one’s own work any portion of the published or unpublished materials of another without attribution; and,
  3. Borrowing from another’s work, data, and facts which are not in the domain of common knowledge.

Complicity is the giving of assistance or the attempt to give assistance to another for the purpose of perpetrating academic dishonesty.

Sanctions

The penalties for conviction of the first offense of academic dishonesty may include the following and the penalties will be determined by the severity of the offense:

  1. Formal warning;
  2. Grade of “F” for the assignment;
  3. Grade of “F” for the course; or
  4. Suspension for a period ranging from one semester to a year.

Conviction of a second academic dishonesty offense will result in expulsion from the University.

Complete rules governing the Academic Integrity Policy and procedures for appealing any part of the policy may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies, NCCU, Durham, NC 27707.

Grade Appeal Procedures

The grade appeal policy is intended to provide a standardized, formal process for undergraduate students to resolve instances of alleged unfair or improper treatment in academic matters. The policy seeks to protect both students and faculty from acts of caprice, while preserving the integrity of the teaching/evaluation process. The policy is written to be consistent with the university’s concern for due process through a system of appeals.

A student is allowed to remain in class during an appeal except in cases where the student’s remaining in class would endanger human life or the integrity of the academic program.

Step 1: A student who believes that he or she has been graded unfairly or improperly must first schedule a conference with the concerned faculty member to attempt to arrive at a mutual understanding and to resolve any differences in an informal, cooperative manner. The student must express the appeal clearly, in writing,  and listen to the instructor’s rationale. The meeting should be scheduled within 10 class days of the incident or two weeks after the student could reasonably be expected to be informed of the assigned grade.

Step 2: If consultation with the instructor is impractical or if the student is dissatisfied with the results of the initial conference with the instructor, the student must seek the assistance of the department chair within five class days of meeting with the instructor. If the instructor involved is the department chair or if a satisfactory solution is not reached, the student should seek the assistance of the appeals counselor. This contact should be made within five days of the meeting with the department chair. The appeal counselor’s role is to guide the student through the remaining steps of the appeals process. In no way is the role of the counselor to be construed as that of advocate for either the student or the instructor.

Step 3:  A student may choose to file a formal grievance. However, a formal grievance may be filed only after conferring with the appeals counselor.  The grievance must include the following:  (a) date of incident; (b) date of first meeting with instructor; (c) reasons for which the student contends that the assigned grade is improper or unfair; (d) reasons for which the student believes that the grade should be changed or for why other corrective action should be taken; and (e) copies of any and all pertinent examinations, papers, and other relevant materials.

Step 3a: To file a formal grievance, the student must submit four copies of the formal grievance to the counselor. This formal grievance should be submitted on the form designed for that purpose. The grievance must be filed with the Counselor within 20 class days of the initial meeting with the instructor (Step 1).

(In cases of doubt concerning time limits, the appeals counselor will determine whether proper procedures have been followed.)

Failure to meet these deadlines forfeits the student’s right of appeal under this policy. Further, it is understood that only issues documented in the grievance statement will be considered at the subsequent hearing.

Step 4: After a formal grievance has been filed, the appeals counselor must within two class days forward a copy of the student’s grievance to the instructor, the instructor’s immediate supervisor, and to the chairperson of the unit’s Grade Appeals Board.

Step 5: The chair of the unit’s Grade Appeals Board shall convene a meeting of the board not sooner than five and no later than 10 class days after receipt of the grievance statement. In a closed hearing, the student shall present the grievance, including any additional supporting evidence and pertinent arguments.

Decisions by the Grade Appeals Board shall be determined as follows:

A vote concerning the student’s grade appeal shall be taken by the faculty board members and a separate vote shall be taken by the student board members.  If a majority of the faculty group or a majority of the student group vote against the student’s appeal, the student’s appeal is denied.  If a majority of either group votes in favor of the student’s appeal, the board shall recommend that the student appeal be granted.

Step 6a:  If an appeal is determined to be unfounded at the hearing, the chair of the appeals board shall provide written notification of that fact to the student, the faculty member, and the immediate supervisor. Students appealing grades should contact the appropriate dean of the college or school in which the course is offered.

Step 6b: If an appeal is deemed valid, the appeals board shall forward its recommendation to the appropriate dean, including a written account of its deliberations and its recommendations for redress. The dean shall take whatever action is deemed appropriate.

Step 7: Should either the student or the faculty member be dissatisfied with the decision of the dean, a formal, written appeal may be made to the vice-chancellor for Academic Affairs, who will review all written material and make final disposition of the appeal. This final appeal must be filed within five class days of notification of the decision of the dean.

Exceptions to the procedure

If a student is unable to file an appeal because it is the end of classes for a spring or a summer session, the student must, within 20 days of the end of that session, notify the concerned instructor and department chair in writing of his or her intention to appeal a grade when classes resume in the fall. The timetable described in section C is initiated by the beginning of classes in the fall semester.

In the event that the aggrieved student is a graduating senior, a separate process designed to expedite the matter will be followed. The latter process is described as follows:

Step 1: Conference with instructor

Step 2: Conference with department chair or appeals counselor

Step 3: Meet with appeals board. To expedite the matter, the appeals board will establish a time to hear any grievance for which redress is sought. Such a time for hearings should be set not less than 24 hours before the graduation ceremony is scheduled to begin.

Master’s Degree Policies

The general requirements for Master’s degree programs at NCCU are included in this section. For special departmental or program requirements, the student should consult the program specific requirements in the section for the particular college/school and department or program in this Catalog. The student must assume full responsibility for acquaintance with both the general regulations and the special requirements of the Master’s degree for the departmental program which he/she enrolls.

Academic Advisor

The Graduate Coordinator for the Master’s degree program serves as or assigns an academic advisor to all admitted graduate students.  The Academic Advisor is expected to guide the graduate student through all program requirements, advising on such things as the course selection in the program, readiness to take the comprehensive examination, admission to candidacy, and other requirements leading to the master’s degree. Graduate students should meet with the academic advisor at least once each semester to discuss their program, carefully plan their course sequences and selections, register for courses, and review the progress that he/she is making in meeting program requirements.

Program of Study

All graduate students pursuing the Master’s degree should have a Plan of Study by the end of the second semester in the graduate program approved by the student’s Academic Advisor, the Program Coordinator, and Department Chair, as appropriate.  A minimum of 30 credit hours is required in most master’s programs at NCCU and all courses for the Master’s degree, including supporting courses, must be taken at the 5000 level. The academic performance of the graduate student in all coursework must meet or exceed the minimum requirements of the Graduate School including maintaining a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 with no “F” grade and not more than one “C” grade.  Many graduate programs administer a comprehensive written examination to qualify the student for admission to candidacy for the degree. Generally, the Thesis or Non-thesis program option must be selected, and if the Non-thesis option is selected, then project, practicum, or coursework must be chosen as appropriate for the program.  If the student chooses thesis, project or practicum, then a Graduate Faculty Advisor is assigned based on area of interest to guide the student to completion of this graduate work.

Foreign Language Proficiency

Graduate students seeking the Master’s degree will be required to demonstrate reading proficiency in a foreign language approved by the department or to successfully complete a course in either statistics or a computer language. The foreign language requirement, or the appropriate substitute, must be satisfied prior to admission to candidacy.

The student who takes the foreign language examination in French, German or Spanish should arrange a conference with the chairperson of the Department of Modern Foreign Languages who will give advice on how to prepare for the examination.

International students whose native language is not English, who are seeking a master’s degree in which a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is required, may not offer their native language in satisfaction of this requirement. They may offer a reading knowledge of what is to them a modern foreign language. They are eligible to undertake an examination in English composition and reading comprehension in satisfaction of the requirement of a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language.

Comprehensive Written Qualifying Examination

In addition to the examinations that occur in individual courses, most graduate programs require students to pass a comprehensive written examination to qualify for admission to Candidacy for the Master’s Degree. This comprehensive written examination covers subjects from courses within the major. The graduate student should have successfully completed at least nine (9) credit hours in his/her program of study and maintained a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 before taking the comprehensive written examination. No qualifying written comprehensive examination is required in the MBA, MIS, and MLS programs.

The Graduate Program Coordinator establishes a committee of examiners, representing both major and minor areas, and administers comprehensive written examination. A student failing to pass this examination may, after the lapse of a semester, apply for and secure reexamination. Should a second failure occur, approval for a third examination must be granted by the department chair or academic dean, as appropriate. In the event of a third failure, the student has no recourse and he/she is dismissed from the graduate program and admissions to Graduate School terminated.

The academic department determines the date when it will administer the comprehensive written examination for its graduate program. This examination can be scheduled any time before the due date to report the results to the School of Graduate Studies. The due date to report the results of the comprehensive written examination to the School of Graduate Studies is five business days before the University Registrar’s deadline as posted in the academic calendar. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies reports the results of the comprehensive written examination to the University Registrar for posting on the student’s transcript.

Upon successfully passing the comprehensive written qualifying examination the student is qualified to proceed to admission to candidacy and to thesis, project or portfolio work in the graduate program and to complete any remaining graduate coursework requirements in the Plan of Study.  A Graduate Faculty Advisor is then appointed to guide the student in research or other professional work that leads to a thesis, project or portfolio.

Admission to Candidacy for the Master’s Degree (Thesis Option)

Admission to Candidacy for the Master’s degree when the thesis option is selected usually follows successful completion of a minimum number of credit hours of graduate course work in the program; satisfying a foreign language requirement; and passing a comprehensive written examination. Once the graduate student has met eligibility requirements, the student’s Graduate Faculty Advisor starts the recommendation for admission to candidacy by preparing application forms provided by the School of Graduate Studies.

The student in consultation with his/her Graduate Faculty Advisor identifies two other graduate faculty members to serve on the student’s Graduate Committee for the thesis, project or portfolio.  The Graduate Faculty Advisor serves as the chairperson of the student’s Graduate Committee. The student with his/her Graduate Committee develops a plan for the thesis, project or portfolio and the Title and Plan for the Thesis or Project or Portfolio is approved by the academic department for the graduate program.

After department and college/school approval, the application for Admission to Candidacy for the Master’s Degree is submitted to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies for review and approval by the Graduate Council of the Graduate School. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies reports the admission to candidacy to the University Registrar for posting on the student’s transcript and notifies the graduate student that he/she is approved as a Candidate for the Master’s Degree.

Admission to candidacy should be met no later than one semester before the student wishes to apply for graduation. Students should refer to program specific eligibility requirements for candidacy in non-thesis, coursework option graduate programs. 

Admission to Candidacy for the Master’s Degree (Non-Thesis Option)

When the non-thesis option is selected, students should consult their specific graduate program as admission to candidacy for non-thesis Master’s degree programs requirements, if any, varies. 

Master’s Thesis

Candidates for the master’s degree must produce an acceptable Thesis when this is the chosen option in the graduate program.  The preparation of the thesis should show the capacity of the student under guidance to accomplish independent investigation, and it must demonstrate mastery of the methodology of research.  It is not expected or required that the thesis in every case be an original contribution to knowledge.  The student, in the preparation of the thesis, is concerned with knowledge and the evidential bases on which the knowledge rests. Credit equal to that of one full course (3 semester hours) will be granted when a thesis is successfully defended. A maximum of six credit hours can be awarded for a thesis. The student’s Graduate Committee chaired by the Faculty Advisor serves as the student’s graduate examining committee for the thesis and oral defense. Review and approval of the thesis is the responsibility student’s graduate examining committee and the academic department for the graduate program.

An electronic copy of an acceptable thesis must be inspected in the Graduate Office for compliance with the Graduate School’s requirements of form and style. Final approved documents must be recorded in the Office of Graduate Studies-Enrolled Student Services not later than the date specified in the academic calendar.  A copy of the regulations regarding form, style, and physical requirements for theses and procedures for electronic submission may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies-Enrolled Student Services.

Project

Candidates for the master’s degree produce an acceptable project when this is the chosen option in the graduate program.  The Non-thesis Project Option varies in form depending on the specific graduate program requirement. Typically, students have specific course requirements associated with the project option; carry out a research investigation under graduate faculty supervision; write and submit a scholarly document on the research; and defend the research project in an oral examination. Credit equal to that of one full course (3 semester hours) will be granted when a project is successfully defended. A maximum of six credit hours can be awarded for a project. The student’s Graduate Committee chaired by the Faculty Advisor serves as the student’s graduate examining committee for the project and oral defense. Review and approval of the project is the responsibility student’s graduate examining committee and the academic department for the graduate program.

Portfolio

Candidates for the master’s degree must submit an acceptable Portfolio when this is the chosen option in the graduate program.  There is no course credit granted for the portfolio requirement.  The purpose of the portfolio is to demonstrate competency in knowledge and skills in the proposed area of study. Various types of portfolios are required by different program areas, therefore students must consult with his/her Graduate Faculty Advisor or the Graduate Coordinator about specific program portfolio requirements. Students should keep a written log of the projects and papers that they plan to submit as part of their portfolio.  Student projects should be reviewed each semester with the student’s advisor.

PR to P Grade

The PR   grade denotes that a student registered in a thesis, project, research, or internship course has made satisfactory progress but has not successfully completed the required work. Upon successfully defense of the written thesis or project, the PR grade in the previously registered thesis or project course may be changed to a P (PASS) grade.

Final Master’s Examinations

The final examination for the Master’s degree is the evaluation of the written thesis or project and is the oral examination covering the thesis or project and its application in the major and minor subjects, or may be the oral or written defense of the culminating portfolio.  For the School of Education, a Comprehensive Written Final Examination covering the courses within the major is required. A student failing to pass the final examination(s) may, after the lapse of a semester, apply for and secure reexamination. Should a second failure occur, approval for a third examination must be granted by the department chair or academic dean, as appropriate. In the event of a third failure, the student has no recourse and he/she is dismissed from the graduate program and admissions to Graduate School terminated. The Graduate Faculty Advisor serves as the chair of the student’s Graduate Committee and the student’s Graduate Committee serves as the examining body for the thesis, project or portfolio and for the oral final examination.

Electronic Submission of Theses and Dissertations

Once the student has successfully defended his/her thesis or dissertation and the content of the thesis or dissertation has been approved by the student’s committee, the student must submit the thesis or dissertation document electronically to the ProQuest ETD (electronic theses & dissertations) site for publishing.  (ProQuest Dissertation Publishing, formerly University Microfilms (UMI) and now part of ProQuest, is a business in Ann Arbor, Michigan, that has created Dissertation Abstracts, an index of over 2 million dissertations.)

The ProQuest electronic submission tool is called UMI ETD Administrator. If the ProQuest/UMI Traditional Publishing option is chosen, submission is free.  Supplementary materials, such as audio, video, and spreadsheets, are integral to the thesis or dissertation, they can submitted as supplementary files during the online submission process. A copyright of the work can be registered for an additional fee.

The student must complete, secure Committee signatures, and submit to the School of Graduate Studies a Thesis/Dissertation Submission Request and Document Approval Form before ETD access is given. The deadline for to submit the Thesis/Dissertation Submission Request and Document Approval Form to the School of Graduate Studies is ten business days before the University Registrar’s deadline for theses/projects as posted in the academic calendar. The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies issues to the student a log-in and password to the ProQuest ETD and reports the results of the oral defense of the theses/projects to the University Registrar for posting on the student’s transcript.

ETD submissions are reviewed for formatting by an Administrator in the NCCU School of Graduate Studies. If the Administrator requires corrections to made, an email is sent to the student requesting revisions. The student must make a new ETD submission of the revised version of the document with the corrections.  When the submission has been accepted by the Administrator, the student will receive email confirmation. The approved ETDs will be released to ProQuest/UMI after the end of the term the student applied to graduate.  It can take 8-12 weeks before the ETD is available online by ProQuest/UMI Dissertation Publishing.

The Second Master’s Degree

The program of graduate study of a student who wishes to earn a second master’s degree must conform to the following policy:

  1. Each candidate must satisfy all requirements for admission to the Graduate Division as detailed in this catalog.
  2. Each candidate must complete a minimum of 18 semester hours in addition to those completed for the first master’s degree. After having completed nine semester hours, each student’s performance will be evaluated by the department awarding the second master’s degree.
  3. In addition to the minimum 18 semester hour requirement, each candidate must complete a research thesis or project or portfolio in the area in which he or she wishes to earn the second master’s degree.
  4. The department chairperson or department representative has the responsibility for recommending a program of study for each prospective candidate to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.
  5. The Graduate School Dean has the responsibility for reviewing and approving each proposed program for a second master’s degree.
  6. The Graduate Council of the Graduate School shall review all programs of study for second master’s degrees so that the graduate faculty will know the nature of the clientele being served.

Graduation

All requirements–including the coursework; comprehensive written examination; foreign language requirement; thesis, project or portfolio;  and the oral final examination–must be completed by the dates listed in the academic calendar in order for a student to receive his/her Master’s degree during the desired semester.

Students must apply for graduation at the beginning of the semester of the intended graduation date.  Applications, which are available through the Registrar’s Office, must be submitted by the deadline announced in the University Calendar.  In addition to this requirement, students must complete a Request for Degree Checkout with their Graduate Coordinator.  If requirements are not met for graduation during the semester of graduation, students must apply again in the Registrar’s Office.

Eligibility for graduation with honors by graduate students usually requires the following cumulative grade point averages:

  • Summa Cum Laude:  3.92 - 4.00;
  • Magna Cum Laude:    3.85 - 3.919;
  • Cum Laude:              3.77 - 3.849.

Students should consult their specific graduate program on eligibility requirements for honors as there may be differences in some cases.