Jan 19, 2020  
Graduate School Course Catalog 2018-2019 
    
Graduate School Course Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    BUS 5100 - Essentials of Marketing and Management for MBA (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: Bachelor’s degree. Enrollment in this course requires permission of the Director of Graduate Programs in the School of Business.  Essentials of Management  and Marketing. The course is an introduction to marketing and management business principles for post-baccalaureate students. The course provides an overview and analysis of fundamental managerial and marketing functions and processes, to include organizational structure, market analysis, product development and distribution, and branding activities that influence effective decision making and implementation in organizations. Enrollment in this course requires permission of the Director of Graduate Programs in the School of Business. 


    Click here for the Fall 2019 Class Schedule


  
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    CIS 5620 - Project Management (3)


    Prerequisites: CIS 5520 Management Information Systems   and MGT 5560 Behavioral and Management Theory and Analysis  or consent of the instructor This course introduces the concepts and techniques of project management for a broad range of projects, including information systems and business projects. Topics include resource management, organizational factors, project manager responsibilities, and team building, risk management, cost management, change management,quality management, project office, outsourced projects and ERP projects. Tools and techniques for project estimating and scheduling will be presented. Students will complete both case studies and a real-world group project to apply to the knowledge they learned to practical experiences. 


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    CON 5201 - Ethical & Professional Orientation to Counseling (3)


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the ethical and professional issues in the professional field of counseling.  Additionally, identity of the professional counselor, characteristics/dispositions of an effective counselor, and self-exploration in relation to that role are also examined.


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    CON 5326 - Traditional and Contemporary Issues in Addictions (3)


    This course is designed to give insight into the complex fields of traditional and current drug abuse, compulsive behaviors, treatment, recovery, and prevention.  Additionally, this course will provide insight on :  a) traditions and philosophies of recovery treatment models and support groups; and b) ethics, confidentiality, and legal issues.  It is further designed to give a global perspective on current issues in the addiction treatment field.  This course consists of selected readings based on:  a)traditional models of treatment and recovery; b) substance use related ethical concerns; c) empirical research; d) relevant evidence - based practices; and e) current issues in the substance and process addictions.  Traditional issues impacting addiction include but are not limited to:  traditional views of addiction and addiction treatment; the development of self-help addiction groups; and the formation of professional addiction services.  Current issues impacting addiction include but are not limited to:  Living with drugs, dependency and addiction; major drugs of use and abuse; drugs and crime; the social impact of drugs; as well as prevention, treatment and education are addressed.


    Click here for the Fall 2019 Class Schedule


  
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    CON 5327 - Prevention, Treatment, & Intervention of Alcohol, Drug & Behavioral Addictions (3)


    This course focuses on substance use and behavioral health issues as related to addiction prevention, treatment, intervention, and their effective implementation with all individuals.  This course will cover the 12 core functions of addiction counseling.  Additionally, this course will cover prevention, treatment and intervention methodologies related to substance use.  The program is designed and delivered from a substance use and clinical mental health counseling perspective.  The clinical areas, issues, and interventions presented and discussed can be applied by a variety of substance use and behavioral health professionals to assist individuals and groups in need of substance use and/or behavioral health intervention.


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    CON 5328 - Alcohol, Drug & Behavioral Addictions: Family & Crisis Intervention (3)


    An examination of the range of substance abuse issues impacting the family system, including crisis intervention.  Topics will include:  a) etiology of substance abuse and addiction within the family; b) impact upon members of the system and its dynamics; c) family and crisis interventions and treatment approaches; and d) long-term recovery issues associated with family and crisis interventions.  This course will address the dynamics of substance abuse in the family system in terms of theory, prevention, and treatment.  Additionally, this course will address crisis intervention techniques that can be used with individuals and families.  Treatment will involve an examination of assessment, treatment, and aftercare approaches with families.  Finally multicultural issues as they relate to families will be discussed.


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    CON 5340 - Counseling Children with Special Needs (3)


    This course provides an overview of the role of the school counselor in the education of children with special needs.  The course provides an in-depth review of the knowledge and skills required in working as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive wrap-around services for individuals with special needs.  For the purpose of this course, special needs will encompass the following domains:  special educational, alternative and at-risk, and gifted and talented.


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    CON 5350 - Clinical Interventions in Events of Crisis, Grief, and Trauma (4)


    This course is designed to present contemporary best practice interventions in events of crisis, grief, and trauma.  This course synthesizes research and practice models for working with pre-school to elder life stage individuals, intervening with cultural competence, and practicing with individuals, groups, families, and communities impacted by these events.  This course educates helping professionals in crisis response leadership, psychological first aid, and trauma-informed care principles in schools, clinics, and communities. 


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    DSC 5015 - Quantitative Methods I for MBA (2)


    Covers algebraic operations, linear and quadratic equations, functions and graphs, systems of equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, differentiation and integration, applications to business problems.


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    DSC 5020 - Quantitative Methods II for MBA (2)


    Descriptive statistics, basic notions of probability, discrete random variable, the normal distribution, estimation and testing hypotheses for the one and two sample cases, correlation, introduction to SAS and Excel.


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    EASC 5320 - Programming and Logic for the Geosciences (3)


    This class serves as an introduction to GIS programming in which students learn about fundamentals of programming logic and a programming environment where GIS software capabilities can be extended using a variety of programming languages. Students will learn about rudimentary programming structures such as variables,decision structures, looping and basic string and mathematics functions used to process data. Students will learn about the ArcGIS programming environment and how to develop basic programming code to automate and customize tasks within the confines of ArcGIS software using languages to include Python, R and VBScript. This class will culminate in a semester-long project that simulates a problem that a student may experience in the professional realm. No prior computer programming experience required.


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    EDAM 5333 - The Principalship (3)


    This course will introduce students to effective practices for leading schools.  This course will examine the role and responsibilities of K12 principals and evaluate leadership problems of practice.  Students will explore trust building, teacher leadership, racial bias, supervision and student discipline.  Students will utilize case studies, reflections and class discussions in a participatory learning environment.


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    EDAM 5340 - School Finance, Budgeting and Human Resource Management (3)


    This course will provide students with knowledge about current practices in school finance and budgeting in North Carolina.  Students will explore adequacy and equitability of funding.  In addition, students will examine the sources of school funding in North Carolina including Title I and Title III federal funding.  Students will explore spending deadlines, the financing of teacher supplies and materials, the management of club accounts, the monitoring of balance/deposit sheets for fraud and irregularities, and oversight of payroll, and school credit cards.  Students will also develop induction and recruitment plans and become familiar with state statutes that govern human resource management.


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    EDEC 5530 - Practicum in Vision Rehabilitation Therapy (3)


    Permission of the instructor required. Designed as a culmination of the university training program, this 350 hours of supervised teaching experience bridges the gap between theoretical aspects of the specialty courses and must be established, with the instructor, at least one semester prior to actual enrollment. 


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    EDEC 5610 - Psychosocial Implications of Blindness and Visual Impairment (3)


    Learners explore psychosocial factors affecting the adjustment process to visual impairment across the life span and study issues related to adjustment including demographics, life stage, type of visual impairment, personality, self-concept, social support network, and the grieving process. Learners also explore the impact of cultural and societal attitudes and diversity, as well as stereotypes of blindness and visual impairment on adjustment. They will also be introduced to effective relationship building and communication skills strategies. An overview of the range of psychosocial interventions is provided including resources for referrals. 


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    EDEC 5612 - Vision Rehabilitation Therapy: Advanced Theory and Practice (3)


    This course covers the Vision Rehabilitation Therapy process, including interviewing skills, assessment techniques, and lesson planning. The course emphasizes comprehensive vision rehabilitation therapy assessment and instructional strategies that include the principles of adult learning theory. Learners are provided with opportunities to observe adults and older adults with vision impairment who are receiving rehabilitation instruction in adaptive living skills in center-and community-based settings as well as learn advanced skills via blindfold practical experience. 


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    ENGG 5010 - Critical Writing in English Studies (3)


    Critical Writing in English Studies is a graduate level writing theory and practice seminar.  Assigned readings and activities are designed to demystify the scholarly practices and genres typical of graduate writing.  Readings and discussions introduce students to rhetorical and composition theories that will help them develop a theoretical basis for their critical writing.


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    HISG 5072 - Women in the African Diaspora (3)


    This course is a comparative study of women in the African Diaspora.  The course explores the sociocultural constructions of race and the processes of acculturation and resistance among people of African descent in the ‘New World’ and the ‘Old War’.  We will focus on women in Africa and its Diaspora communities in the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America.


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    HISG 5270 - Constitutional History of the United States (3)


    This course will explore the United States Constitution from its framing to the Regents of the University of California v. Bakke case in 1978.  The course will address selected themes that connect the United States Constitution to the broader political, economic, social, cultural, educational, gender, race and ethnic issues present in American history during the time frame.  A knowledge of United States Supreme Court decisions helps us to understand American history because these decisions reflect the issues and problems present at any given time.  The course examines issues which led to the creation of the constitution in 1787, the ratification process, and the many problems that occurred soon after its ratification.  How did the framers of the Constitution address the institution of slavery in 1787?  Did the constitution allow for the establishment of a National Bank?  How was the Constitution used to support the Alien and Sedition Acts passed by Congress in 1798, and how did Thomas Jefferson and James Madison use it to support their writings of the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions that sought to overturn the Acts?  As the new nation faced issues of interstate commerce and the quest to remove Native Americans from their sacred lands, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, civil rights for black Americans, war, the Cold War, and other concerns, they turned to the courts for remedy.


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    HISG 5522 - The Black Female Body in American Culture (3)


    This course examines the constructions, representations, forms of appropriation and liberation of the Black female body in cross-cultural, historical and contemporary perspective.  It will take an interdisciplinary approach to interrogate the ways that the treatment, constructions and representations of the Black female body has intersected with the distribution of social power and resources.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways that the intersecting hierarchies of gender, race, class, sexuality and culture.


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    HISG 5525 - Black Women and Slavery (3)


    The purpose of this course is to investigate African American women’s history during the colonial era to 1865.  The principal focus of the course is to apply analytical frameworks of race, gender and class to understand the life cycles and multiple roles of women of African descent as mothers, daughters, wives, workers and social change agents.  Throughout the course, we will utilize a variety of monographs as well as primary source materials to document black women’s experiences in slavery.


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    HISG 5534 - Black Feminist and Feminist Thought (3)


    The purpose of this course is to examine the history of Black feminist theory and scholarship.  The course will explore topical areas in Black feminist and feminist scholarship.  It pays particular attention to theoretical perspectives that examine local, national, and international topics that include:  the social construction of gender and sexuality; definitions of womanhood; the female body and the politics of representation; comparative feminisms; women’s culture; political and economic expressions; and women’s activism and participation in social transformation will be included.


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    HISG 5536 - Black Women and Activism (3)


    The purpose of this course is to highlight the multiple ways black women activists have shaped United States History.  Through this course, students will explore and examine the struggles and accomplishments of Black women activists.  The course also examines black women’s clubs, groups, and organizations in the hopes of creating a more accurate portrayal of the impact these individuals and groups have had on society.  The second half of the course will enable students to see more clearly how black women served as critical agents in uplifting their communities, particularly during tremendous periods of interracial turmoil and heightened group tensions.


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    HIST 5240 - Southern Legal History (3)


    This course traces the history of the legal system in the American South from the colonial era to the present.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of local, state, and federal laws and courts, and how social, economic, and cultural developments and social movements have changed the law in the South.


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    INBS 8000 - Health Disparities in Human Diseases (3)


    This course provides theoretic and translational tools to prepare students for problem-solving and research in reducing health disparities.  The course examines disparities in health and health outcomes for and among racial/ethnic groups and subgroups.  The course includes review and debate of social, political, economic, cultural, biological, legal and ethical theories related to health disparities from historical and current perspectives in the United States.  The course involves inquiry into health disparities through critical review of diverse evidential data sources, scientific research reports, and assessments of intervention practices.  Students synthesize the knowledge and information on health disparities gained through the course and integrate their learning by presenting realistic study designs for health disparities research.


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    INBS 8100 - Multidisciplinary Problem Solving (3)


    This course engages students in problem-solving methodologies from multiple scientific disciplines in the study of health disparities.  This course is structured for team-based learning and promotes team interaction and integration of multidisciplinary approaches to solving problems in science.  Students conduct an extensive review of the literature on disease system modeling; construct novel health disease conceptual models; and present their models as research proposal presentations.


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    INBS 8110 - Responsible Conduct of Research (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: Must be current masters or PhD student or permission from the instructor. This course is designed to provide students with the continuing education in the responsible conduct of research required to prepare them to conduct themselves as ethical scientists and to remain eligible for federal funding.  The course introduces students to concepts, rules, and issues central to research ethics in conducting research, the handling of animals and humans in the research process and publishing of research results.  Learning to become a responsible and successful researcher can be complicated and intellectually challenging.  Therefore, introducing students to concepts, rules, and issues that are central to reseach ethics also requires practice in thinking critically about difficult cases.


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    INBS 8700 - Graduate Seminar in Integrated Biosciences I (1)


    This course is the first of a two-part seminar series which develops core skills of inquiry for approaching modern scientific research for first-year doctoral students.  The two-part seminar series provides to students continually updated information on current research related to health disparities, methods for interpreting and critiquing scientific literature, exercises in problem identification and idea generation, and techniques for presenting research data and findings in oral formats for professional meetings and written formats for peer-reviewed publications.  In the first part of the series, students critically analyze, lead discussions, and make presentations on selected research literature.  In the second part of the series, students prepare and present a research poster and give a seminar in a scientific meeting format on work from their engagement in research rotations or supervised research.


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    INBS 8710 - Graduate Seminar in Integrated Biosciences II (1)


    Prerequisites:   Continuation of INBS 8700.  This course is the second of a two-part seminar series which develops core skills of inquiry for approaching modern scientific research for first-year doctoral students.  The two-part seminar series provides to students continually updated information on current research, methods for interpreting and critiquing scientific literature, exercises in problem identification and idea generation, and techniques for presenting research data and findings in oral formats for professional meetings and written formats for peer-reviewed publications.  In the first part of the series, students critically analyze, lead discussions, and make presentations on selected research literature.  In the second part of the series, students prepare and present a research poster and give a seminar in a scientific meeting format on work from their engagement in research rotations or supervised research.


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    INBS 8800 - Research Rotation I (2)


    This course is the first of a two-semester laboratory rotations sequence for first-year doctoral students in the Integrated Biosciences (INBS) PhD program.  This is a research laboratory course in which students pursue research projects of limited scope, 8-weeks at a time, under the supervision of an INBS faculty member.  Up to three research rotations may be completed by first-year students during the first two semesters of their program of study.  During the first part of the first semester course, doctoral students are introduced to INBS research faculty and their research through presentations and laboratory visits.  Students select the research and laboratories through which they will rotate and they complete their first rotation during the last part of the first semester course.  Up to two additional research rotations are completed by the students during the second semester course.  This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.  (10 laboratory hours per week)


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    INBS 8810 - Research Rotation II (2)


    Continuation of INBS 8800.  This course is the second of a two-semester laboratory rotations sequence of in which doctoral students pursue research projects of limited scope, 8-weeks at a time, under the supervision of an INBS faculty member.  Up to three research rotations may be completed by first-year students during the first two semesters of their program of study.  This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.


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    INBS 8930 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9)


    This course involves directed research under the guidance of a member of the Integrated Biosciences (INBS) program faculty prior to the student being admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree.  Students will perform advanced research and hone research skills toward identification of a dissertation research project.  This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.  (10-30 laboratory hours per week)


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    INBS 8950 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9)


    Prerequisites: Admission to PhD candidacy This course involves dissertation research under the mentorship of a member of the Integrated Biosciences (INBS) program faculty after the student has been admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree.  Students will conduct original and substantial research to satisfy the dissertation requirement of the PhD degree program.  This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.  (5-30 laboratory hours per week)


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    INBS 9000 - Doctoral Dissertation Preparation (3)


    Prerequisites: PhD candidacy and completed dissertation research This course is for PhD candidates who have completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation defense, including credit hour requirements, preliminary examination, residency requirements, and dissertation research.  PhD candidates registering for this course are those who are writing their dissertation and preparing to defend their dissertation.  This course is offered on a Pass/Fail basis.


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    PADG 5000 - Professional Skill Laboratory I (3)


    The course is designed for students in the first semester of the Executive Master of Public Administration program. The course objective is to provide students with a summer experience that will enhance their ability to lead in the public sector. The course is presented in a series of modules that focus on a specific public sector leadership skill with theses skill interwoven into major modules. 


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    PADG 5031 - Public Transportation Service Management (3)


    This course provides critical managerial skills for students who desire to manage public transportation systems in the U.S.  Students are introduced to the emergence of public transit systems in the U.S., and review present and future trends with emphasis on how the public mass transportation industry is currently funded and managed.  Most public transit systems in the U.S. are funded largely by the federal government and to a lesser degree by states and local governments.  A number of federal, state and local government rules, policies and guidelines exist that must be understood and followed by transit managers to guarantee continued funding assistance.  This course will cover a number of these rules and regulations and equip students with the knowledge and expertise needed for them to become successful transit managers.  Students will also gain practical experience through internship and apprenticeship programs currently offered by the City of Durham and the North Carolina Department of Transportation.


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    PADG 5320 - Laboratory on Mediation and Negotiation (3)


    Lab in Mediation is designed to give students an introduction to the theory and skills that comprise the practice of alternative dispute resolution/conflict management, with an emphasis on mediation in the workplace. Students will learn a basic model of the mediation process, with practical skills to guide the process to completion. Role-plays and simulations will be used to develop students’ skills as mediators and practitioners of conflict management and resolution. 


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    PHRD 8000 - Pharmacology (3)


    Prerequisites: Human Physiology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology This course covers general principles of pharmacology and drug therapy in humans.  This course provides an introduction to pharmacokinetics, drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity.  This course also incorporates in-depth studies of the principles of neuropharmacology and cardiovascular pharmacology, as well as case studies of anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-cancer drugs.


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    PHRD 8000 - Pharmacology (3)


    Prerequisites: Human Physiology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology This course covers general principles of pharmacology and drug therapy in humans.  This course provides an introduction to pharmacokinetics, drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity.  This course also incorporates in-depth studies of the principles of neuropharmacology and cardiovascular pharmacology, as well as case studies of anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-cancer drugs.


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    PHRD 8100 - Drug Discovery (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite:   or with the consent of the course director. This course will provide an overview of the fundamental processes and scientific approaches involved in early phase drug discovery as practiced in the pharmaceutical industry.  Major classes of drug targets including kinases, G-protein coupled receptors, proteases and nuclear receptors will be introduced in detail.  Topics related to target identification/target validation, screening technologies, and medicinal chemistry/chemoinformatics approach to drug optimization will be discusssed.


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    RECG 5100 - Philosophical and Social Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Services (3)


    Exploration of philosophical, historical, and social foundations and developments in leisure and recreation; analyses of the historical significance of leisure in modern societies; critical review of seminal writings in the field and their application to the profession.


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    RECG 5152 - Advanced Methods and Processes in Recreational Therapy (3)


    This course will review the theoretical and practical examination of contemporary interventions and processes in recreational therapy.  Students will demonstrate understanding of evidence-based research and practices in non-traditional recreational therapy techniques.


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    RECG 5905 - Graduate Internship in Physical Education and Recreation (6)


    Prerequisites: Approval of Advisor. Complete a supervised field experience of no less than 10 weeks and 400 clock hours at an approved physical education/recreation agency, culminating in a written project.


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    STAT 5210 - Mathematical Statistics (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: Graduate student status. This course covers the mathematical theory of statistical inference at a rigorous level.  The emphasis is on frequentist methods with appropriate attention given to Bayesian approaches.  Topics include probability distributions, mathematical expectations, sampling distributions, notions of convergence, point estimators, interval estimators and hypothesis tests.  Students are expected to have a working knowledge of multiple integrals and partial derivatives.  This course is intended to prepare students for PhD programs in mathematics, statistics, engineering and related disciplines.


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    STAT 5215 - Statistical Methods (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: STAT 5210  or permission of the department. This course presents statistical methods associated with regression and the analysis of variance for various experimental designs.  Theoretical development of statistical models will be covered.  Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, regression models for discrete data, ANOVA, multiple comparisons, ANCOVA, fixed and random effects, nested models, and repeated measures.  The relationship among regression, ANOVA and ANCOVA will be emphasized.  Statistical software will be used to demonstrate these methods.  This course is intended to prepare students for PhD programs in mathematics, statistics, engineering and related disciplines.


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    STQM 5050 - Foundation of Quantitative Methods (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: Bachelor’s degree. Enrollment in this course requires permission of the Director of Graduate Programs in the School of Business.  This course introduces concepts in business, economics, and finance, along with their mathematical/statistical formulation and solution. Topics include:linear and quadratic equations,system of equations, functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, differentiation,descriptive statistics,basic notions of probability, discrete and contours random variables, and foundations of statistical inference. Enrollment in this course requires permission of the Director of Graduate Programs in the School Business. 


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    STQM 5420 - Topics in Regression Analysis (3)


    Prerequisites: DSC 5200  permission of instructor Simple linear regression, inference, transformations, correlation, regression diagnostics; multivariate regression, inference, overall, partial and multiple partial F-tests; dummy variables; analysis of covariance; polynomial regression; selecting best model; analysis of variance and multiple comparison.  Open for advanced undergraduate students with permission of instructor.


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    STQM 5440 - Topics in Categorical Data Analysis (3)


    Prerequisites: STQM 5420   permission of instructor Contingency tables (2x2 table, sets of 2x2 tables, 2xr and sx2 tables, sxr tables), association, Mantel-Haenzel test, observer agreement, rank ANOVA, logistic regression.  Open for advanced undergraduate students with permission of instructor.


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    STQM 5900 - Special Topics in Data Analysis (3)


    Prerequisites:  Permission of instructor. A course in which content may vary each offering.  Interested students must consult with instructor or department chair prior to enrolling.  Topics include:  statistical computing, simulation, survival analysis, cluster analysis, factor analysis, nonparametric statistics, econometrics.  Open for advanced undergraduate students with permission of instructor.   Repeatable May be repeated for credit.


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Accounting

  
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    ACCT 5015 - Essentials of Financial and Managerial Accounting for MBA (2)


    Essentials of Financial and Managerial Accounting covers basic accounting definitions, concepts, principles, transactions (identification and recording), and financial statements, primarily involving sole proprietorships and merchandising businesses.  It also provides a thorough review of the accounting cycle and an overview of an effective accounting information system.  Additional topics covered include accounting for current/long-term liabilities, corporations, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, management accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costing and master budgeting.  The course is not open to students pursuing undergraduate credit.


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    ACCT 5300 - Auditing Theory and Practice (3)


    Prerequisites: ACCT 3620. This course provides a study of the theory and practice of financial statement audits, in the context of management responsibilities and decision-making.


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    ACCT 5410 - Seminar in Accounting Problems and Research (3)


    Prerequisites: ACCT 5300 . This course provides a review of specialized topics, such as inventory valuation, and current FASB pronouncements and accounting challenges. It also provides opportunities for students to develop their research skills and improve their writing and oral communication skills in the context of addressing technical accounting subjects.


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    ACCT 5510 - Managerial Accounting (3)


    The course is concerned with the study and application of accounting concepts in relation to planning and control of business operations. Quantitative techniques and behavioral impact of accounting systems will be included.


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    ACCT 5600 - Legal Environment of Business and Issues for Accountants (3)


    This course presents the legal issues confronting accountants in the area of contract law and commercial law, with selected topics from agency law, property law, business organizations, legal liability of accountants, and securities law.


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    ACCT 5700 - Taxation (3)


    This course provides a study of income tax theory and applications to problems encountered by individuals and businesses, including research, planning, and compliance.


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    ACCT 5800 - Accounting Information Systems (3)


    This course focuses on the concepts, theories, and challenges associated with design and operation of an accounting information system and how it articulates with, and supports, the broader management information system.


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    ACCT 5900 - Accounting Theory (3)


    This course provides analyses of accounting principles, practices, and procedures of complex business enterprises, with emphases on research methods, database use, writing and oral communication skills, ethical issues, and teamork.


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Applied Music

  
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    APPL 5000 - Applied Instrumental/Vocal (2)


    The applied lessons (private study) for instrumental and vocal majors involve one on one instruction for in depth and comprehensive study of the technical, theoretical, and stylistic concepts of their major instrument.


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Biology

  
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    BIOD 8010 - Advanced Cell Biology (3)


    Prerequisites:  None.  This course will provide an overview of principles of Cell Biology, exploring the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins, the function of cellular organelles, and the molecular basis of cell signaling.  The use of recent scientific literature will be used to illustrate important concepts in Cell Biology.


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    BIOD 8020 - Advanced Integrated Genetics (3)


    Prerequisites: Approval of instructor if student does not have a Biology background. This course will provide a broad overview of Genetics outlining:  the central dogma or flow of genetic information from DNA to RNA to protein in eukaryotes and prokaryotes; principles of heredity in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; the roles of eukarytoc mitosis and meiosis; genome-wide and population variation in mammalian inheritance; and the use of bacteria, Drosophila, and zebrafish as models to study biological pathways.  The use of recent scientific literature will be used to illustrate important concepts in genetics.


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    BIOD 8060 - Fundamental Neuroscience (3)


    Prerequisites: BIOD 8010 - Advanced Cell Biology (3) or consent of instructor. The course will provide an overview of fundamentals of neuroscience, exploring thte anatomical organization of the nervous system, cell biology of the nervous system, developmental neurobiology, and function of sensory, motor and autonomic nervous systems.  (2.5 lecture hours per week)


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    BIOD 8075 - Intermediate Biostatistics (3)


    (2 lecture hours and 2 recitation hours per week).  Prerequisites:  None.  This course is an analytical statistics course designed to provide an advanced knowledge of statistical applications in biological research.  Statistics, including analysis of variance, correlation, and regression analysis, followed by introduction of advanced topics such as multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, factor interaction analysis, and more advanced regression analysis will be covered in this course.  Students will gain experience in written and oral communication of statistics, and critical evaluation of statistical approaches to biological and pharmaceutical research problems.


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    BIOD 8080 - Graduate Physiology (3 (2.5 lecture hours))


    Prerequisites:   This course is designed as an MD/PhD-level course for Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  The course is intended to focus mainly on cellular and molecular aspects of physiology, but will address also pathophysiology.  The instructors will provide instruction on the physiology of the nervous, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems.  In addition, the instructors discuss with students ongoing research in their laboratories in the aforementioned disciplines.


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    BIOG 5075 - Intermediate Biostatistics (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: BS Biological and/or Physical Sciences. This is a graduate course intended for students in the M.S. Biology and other graduate STEM Programs.  Students are instructed and trained in the use of biostatistics and emerging data analysis tools to address biological and pharmaceutical research problems.  The course is designed to equip graduate students with essential skills in biostatistics that are needed in their graduate research and future careers.


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    BIOG 5120 - Genetics (3)


    An investigation of molecular structure and function of genetic material, mechanics and control of gene action, and experimental evidence on the mechanism of inheritance, linkage, mapping mutation, and related principles. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5130 - Critical Analysis of Research Literature in Biology (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in biological or chemical disciplines. This course is designed for biology or pharmaceutical science majors. The course is intended to be inter-disciplinary in its attraction, it will train students to critically examine the latest publications on special topics and to design experiments for hypothesis-driven research. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5140 - Toxicology (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. A course that follows a system-based approach to study the toxic effects of chemicals with emphasis on human systems. The anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and special toxicological considerations of organ systems are covered as well as risk assessment and evaluation of toxicity data. (3 lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5210 - Morphology and Physiology of the Invertebrates (3)


    Prerequisites: BIOL 2100 or its equivalent. A study of structural-functional interrelationships among the major invertebrate phyla with consideration of ecological and phylogenetic principles, diversity of invertebrate life, and adaptive change in the evolutionary history of animals. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5300 - Bacteriology (4)


    Prerequisites: BIOL 3200 or consent of instructor. A mechanistic approach to bacterial physiology, the disease process, and related subjects. Laboratory includes current procedures used in a diagnostic laboratory. (Four lecture hours per week.)


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    BIOG 5310 - Cell Biology (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of cell structure at the molecular and cellular levels and the physiological consequences of these structures. Emphasis on the physico-chemical properties and biological attributes of cells, organelles, and biomolecules including proteins and nucleic acids. Analysis of cell regulation at the molecular level. (Four lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5330 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience. (3)


    This course will provide an overview of fundamentals of neuroscience, exploring the anatomical organization of the nervous system, cell biology of the nervous system, developmental neurobiology, and function of sensory, motor and autonomic nervous systems. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5400 - Physiology and Pharmacology I (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. A course that covers 1) autonomic nervous system, 2) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, 3) neuro- and muscle physiology, 4) cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5410 - Selected Topics In Bioinformatics (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. The course is designed for biology and other science majors, who are interested in acquiring the principles of computational biology or bioinformatics, training in the analysis of biological sequences and structures, employing statistical techniques, and learning about the expanding databases in the areas of toxicology, health informatics, and medical genomics (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5420 - Immunology (3)


    Prerequisites: BIOL 5300 or consent of instructor. A consideration of the basic concepts of the immunity mechanisms and their applications to problems in genetics, embryology, physiology, and evolution. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5550 - Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (3)


    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. This is an advanced research, hands-on laboratory course designed to provide a detailed and thorough understanding of common laboratory techniques. This interdisciplinary course is designed for graduate students who have an interest in understanding theory and application of techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology.


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    BIOG 5600 - Protozoology (3)


    Prerequisites: BIOL 2100 or consent of instructor. A study of the morphology, physiology, ecology, and taxonomy of selected free-living and parasitic protozoans. (Three lecture hours per week.).


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    BIOG 5700 - Seminar in Biology (2 hours over 2 semesters)


    Prerequisites: Graduate classification. Each student majoring in biology will be enrolled in a seminar for 2 semesters. (One discussion-presentation hour per week).


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    BIOG 5800 - Research in Biology (1-6)


    Prerequisites: Enrollment as a full-time graduate student; consent of advisor. Research on appropriate problems in biology under the direction of the individual advisor. The course can be repeated; however a maximum of 6 credit hours can be applied to meet graduation requirements.


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    BIOG 5810 - Graduate Project (3)


    Prerequisites: Enrollment in the non-thesis graduate program option. Graduate project based on review and analysis of information obtained from the various databases on genomics and proteomics and/or library research on a focused area of interest. The quality of research projects is expected to be comparable to published review articles in academic journals. The student will register for BIOG 5810 the semester the work is to be completed and defended.


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    BIOG 5820 - Introduction To Graduate Research (2)


    Prerequisites: Graduate classification. This course is a recommended, but not required, graduate course designed as a laboratory rotation to introduce first-year Masters Degree biology students to the various research areas and techniques employed in the laboratories of faculty who can serve as thesis advisors. Students rotate through three research laboratories during the semester. This course may be repeated once for credit, in three different research laboratories, for a total of 4 credit hours.


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    BIOG 5900 - Thesis (3)


    The student must write an acceptable thesis based on original research. The student will register for BIOG 5900 the semester the work is to be completed and defended.


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Chemistry

  
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    CHEG 5000 - Biochemistry (3)


    Prerequisites: Two semesters of organic chemistry and the successful completion of an undergraduate course in biochemistry equivalent to CHEM 4500. The chemistry, bioenergetics, and metabolic roles of prime representatives of the essential groups of compounds in living organisms are emphasized. Sequences, controls, and catalysts involved in major biochemical pathways are included.


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    CHEG 5010 - Bioinorganic Chemistry (3)


    Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry or consent of instructor. A study of the biological processes, which require metal ions such as: respiration, nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis, nerve transmission, muscle contraction, metabolism, and protection against toxic and mutagenic agents. Metal-containing agents, which have been used as diagnostic probes, and drugs will also be discussed.


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    CHEG 5020 - Organometallic Chemistry (3)


    Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry or consent of instructor. A study of the class of substances, which have an organic group directly, bound to a metal ion. This course will focus primarily on the synthesis, structure, reactivity, and characterization of organo-transition metal compounds. Applications in industrial catalysis and organic synthesis will also be discussed.


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    CHEG 5030 - Principles of Protein and Enzyme Biochemistry (3)


    Corequisites: CHEG 5000 . This course will focus on protein structure and dynamics, methods of protein structure determination, principles of enzyme catalysis, protein biosynthesis and posttranslational modification.


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    CHEG 5120 - Spectroscopic Methods of Analysis (4)


    Theory and application of mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy to the analysis of organic and inorganic compounds.


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    CHEG 5130 - Fundamentals of Separation Science (3)


    Pre- or Co-requisite: One year of physical and analytical chemistry at the undergraduate level or consent of instructor. Modern techniques for analytical separations including gas and liquid chromatography and hyphenated methods with emphasis on method development for both small molecules, biological systems and mixtures relevant for environmental analysis.


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    CHEG 5200 - Spectroscopic Methods of Analysis (3)


    Theory and application of mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy to the analysis of organic and inorganic compounds.


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    CHEG 5210 - Principles of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Drug Development (3)


    This course will cover basic principles of 1) membranes, transporters and cell excitability; 2) principles of neurotransmitter and hormone synthesis and metabolism; 3) autonomic nervous system; 4) mechanisms of receptors and cellular signaling; 5) drug metabolism; 6) pharmacokinetics; 7) Drug Toxicology; 8) Drug development & regulation.


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    CHEG 5300 - Chemical Bonding and Stereochemistry (3)


    Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry or consent of instructor. The course will cover group theory and chemical bonding using valence bond and molecular orbital theory. The course will be team taught by members of the faculty from physical, inorganic, and organic chemistry.


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    CHEG 5350 - Computational Chemistry (3)


    This course introduces the background and theory required for the use and understanding of a number of software tools that can assist in solving problems of chemical significance including chemical kinetics, Molecular orbital Theory, molecular modeling, Hartree-Fock methods, and density functional theory.


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    CHEG 5400 - Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3)


    Prerequisites: CHEG 5300  or consent of instructor. The basic theme of this course is organic reaction mechanisms with emphasis on substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangement reactions. The course will also cover stereochemistry and conformation analysis of organic molecules.


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    CHEG 5710 - Advanced Physical Chemistry I (3)


    Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry. A study of the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, approximate methods, molecular spectroscopy, atomic and molecular structures, molecular orbital theory, molecular symmetry, group theory and their applications in chemistry.


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    CHEG 5720 - Advanced Physical Chemistry II (3)


    Prerequisites: One year of physical chemistry. A study of the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, approximate methods, molecular spectroscopy, atomic and molecular structures, molecular orbital theory, molecular symmetry, group theory and their applications in chemistry.


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